New HD500X Patch: Cali Tread

After recently and unexpectedly seeing Whitesnake live, I remembered how much I used to love the guitar tone that John Sykes had when he recorded their 1987 album and his follow-up Blue Murder albums. I’ve always heard that he used a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier for those recordings. The HD500X Cali Tread model is based on the 2001 version of that amp, so I decided to create a patch using the Cali Tread.

You can hear a sample of the patch here, and download at https://brianmhall.wordpress.com/hd500x-guitar-patches.

Unexpected Concert

So, if you had told me two weeks ago that I’d soon be at a Whitesnake concert, I would have just looked at you funny and laughed. But you would have gotten the last laugh because that’s exactly where I was last night.

A friend of mine from church called me up a couple of weeks ago and said, “Hey, I just called a radio show contest and won two tickets to go see Whitesnake. Wanna go?” My first reaction was that he was joking, but it turns out that he wasn’t, so I said, sure, I’ll go.

I’m not much of a Whitesnake fan, but I will admit that in the late 80s, I did like them quite a bit (I just won’t admit if it was the 1880s or 1980s). I even saw them in concert somewhere around ’89 (again, maybe 1889, maybe 1989, I’m not saying). So when my friend asked me to go, I thought it would be fun to go and reminisce. It was actually a pretty fun show.

wsnake

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Microphone Placement With Guitar Amps

Several weeks ago I wrote about stage volume and beaming when it comes to using an amp on stage. Today I want to talk about my experiences using microphones to send the guitar sound to a PA system.

First let me start by saying that I don’t have extensive experience miking amps, and I generally don’t need to either because I either use a multi-fx pedal going straight into a PA system, or the amp itself was enough without needing to have it mic’d.

Having said that, there was a period of time when I did need to use microphones to get my guitar sound into the main speakers controlled by a PA system. I spent quite a lot of time trying to learn the best methods to do so, and after a lot of trial and error, this is what worked best for me.

The main thing that I found, as mentioned in the article I mentioned above, is that the amp has to have enough volume before being mic’d or else you’ll just be amplifying a small, weak guitar sound. The other things that I learned are 1) that you need to find the correct mic placement, 2) that you need to find the best mic angle, and 3) that you need to find the best distance of the mic from the speaker.

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Concert: Burundi Drummers

While this is not exactly guitar related, it is music related. We’ve been very fortunate to have gotten to know the Burundi Drummers over the last year, and we recently were able to participate in one of their concerts (that’s me in the middle with the black shirt on). BurundiConcert Every year I take my family to the “A World A’Fair” festival in Dayton, Ohio. The festival is a great place to see food, clothing, decorations, and entertainment of cultures from all over the world. We go because we enjoy it, but also because my wife is from Romania and it gives her a chance to see things similar to what she’s used to from her home country. Continue reading

Stage Volume and “Beaming”

Yesterday I talked a little bit about using a microphone on stage and why you need to have plenty of volume coming from the amp to get a good mic’d sound.

While there are plenty of times that having your amp loud on stage is perfectly acceptable, there are instances where this can be a problem. Some church worship bands, for instance, understandably require low stage volume for all instrumentalists. Low stage volume also cuts down on speaker beaming, which is what happens when someone’s ears are the direct path of the speaker and they get all of the very harsh frequencies from the center of the speaker cone. If you’ve got a multi-fx pedal, no problem, but what if you need to use an amp and you need some volume to get that really great tone without blowing grandma’s wig off? What can you do?

I’ve been in this situation before, and after trying a number of things over several live sessions, I finally found a solution that worked very well. I found some old kick-drum shields and placed them in front of my amp to block the loud volume from overpowering the room and to block the harsh tone caused by beaming from hitting anyone square in the ears.

kickshield

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Van Halen Shoes

Ok, I admit that this is not directly guitar related, but it is tangentially related. After I purchased our Van Halen tickets earlier this month, my wife bought me the greatest pair of shoes I’ve ever owned for my birthday. She also bought herself a pair of flip flops to wear at the concert (it’s at an outdoor venue and will be in late summer).

EVHShoes

They’re the official EVH shoes from the Van Halen Store. I wore them while playing live a couple of weeks ago. They’re not the most comfortable shoes I’ve ever had (although they aren’t uncomfortable), but hey, they’re Van Halen shoes so I’m not complaining. So now I guess I can “hit the ground runnin’.”

Ain’t Talkin’ (or more appropriately, ain’t singin’)

I’m working on doing a recording of Van Halen’s Ain’t Talkin Bout Love. I recorded vocals myself but it’s just a little out of my range, so I’ve asked my brother to record the vocals instead. I’ve got the basic mix down, and once I get the vocal track from him, I’ll do a final mix/master. We’re basically collaborating through email as I’m in Ohio and he’s in Tennessee. As usual, I’m using a drum loop, and I’m playing all guitar and bass parts. The guitar is a single take, including solos, with some post processing effects added to the solo sections.

Here’s what I have so far (minus the vocals I started to record myself):

Ain’t Talkin Cover

Once my brother is finished recording his part, I’ll upload a final version.

HD500X 5150 Amp Model Sound Sample

PV5150

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that the new Line 6 model packs for the HD500X multi-effects pedal had been released. One of my main interests in the new model packs was the inclusion of the Peavey 5150 amp model, which Line 6 has named “PV Panama” in keeping with their practice of naming amp models in creative ways, rather than naming them the same as the real amp.

Now that I’ve purchased the model packs, I created a sample recording of the raw sound of the 5150 model on the HD500X.

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